Forum, Network and Resource for the Challenges of an Aging Society

Forum, Network and Resource for the Challenges of an Aging Society

What does it take to be 'at home with growing older'?

The challenges of growing older require active inquiry. AHWGO is a group of multi-disciplinary professionals who have come together to re-envision the aging experience. We present monthly events with top-notch speakers on a wide variety of topics. Use our resources to look beyond your own discipline, both for your professional work and your personal aging decisions. Take advantage of our collective experience as you create environments that support people as they age.

Next Events

‘Evolving Cities’: Observations, Insights and Views on Aging in Urban Environments

‘Evolving Cities’: Observations, Insights and Views on Aging in Urban Environments

June 15, 6pm to 8pm
Offices of IDEO
501 The Embarcadero,
Pier 28 Annex, San Francisco

Our built environments have, are and will continue to be morphing spaces. These variances manifest in our social, technological, environmental, economic and physical surroundings. Challenges around the aging of our global population have been creeping up on us for over 50 years. The need to understand the implications for an increasingly aging population is imperative. Older adutls often do not have as prominent a voice when compared to other generational groups. Yet, they make up a growing proportion of urban populations.

This forum will explore these challenges, speculate on urban futures, invite discussion on changes to the built environment with a Bay Area perspective and welcome dialogue on global lessons learned in order to understand and respond to ever-changing challenges and opportunities.

Speaker: Dr. Chris Luebkeman, Arup Fellow and Director of Global Foresight, Research + Innovation

Chris leads the Global Foresight, Research and Innovation group at Arup – a think-tank and consultancy within Arup’s global engineering and design firm. Educated as a geologist, structural engineer and architect he is considered a bridge builder of many kinds. Prior to joining Arup, he taught in the Departments of Architecture at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology [ETH] in Zurich, the University of Oregon, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology [MIT].

His background enables him to specialize in being a generalist with a view of being “in league with the future”. He’s been described as the “Willy Wonka of the built environment, conjuring up dreams of a future where we can cure our ills through faith, physics and forethought”; was named a Senior Fellow of the Design Futures Council, in 2004; and was identified as one of the ten future speculators and shapers “Who will change the way we live”, in Wallpaper Magazine.

On The Intention Not To Slow Down

On The Intention Not To Slow Down

May 18, 6pm to 8pm
Ed Roberts Campus At Ashby Bart
3075 Adeline Street, Berkeley 

Poet and psychologist, Anita Barrows, Ph.D., will read from her new book of poetry, We Are The Hunger.  She will share her creative journey as a poet, how growing older has shaped her writing, and what it has meant to stay engaged in her work and the world.Dr. Barrows has won numerous national awards for her poetry, including a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Quarterly Review Award, Riverstone Press Award and the Centrum Foundation.  Her works have appeared in the Nation, Prairie Schooner, Bridges, and many other journals.  Dr. Barrows is also a translator from French, Italian, and German.  She’s had twelve volumes of translations published by American and British publishers – including three volumes of the poetry and prose of Rainer Maria Rilke.Dr. Barrows has maintained a private practice as a clinical psychologist in Berkeley since 1988 and is a tenured professor of psychology at The Wright Institute.  She has worked as a psychological consultant internationally in areas of war and occupation. She is trained in homeopathy, cognitive-behavioral, and mindfulness techniques as well as in Jungian psychodynamic therapy, sandtray and other play therapy methods. Dr. Barrows has two daughters, a granddaughter, a grandson, and shares her house with dogs, cats and birds and, in fact, is a specialist in animal-assisted therapy.

Of Interest

Design x Technology + Medicine = Embolden Bodies

Design x Technology + Medicine = Embolden Bodies

Something we have been talking at AHWGO becomes more of a reality through 3D printing. The designers and architects Charles and Ray Eames brought design many years ago into medicine but somehow this marriage was suspended until just now.  Ted Talk illustrates possibilities.

The Architecture of Palliative Care

Thirteen architecture students from Kansas State University visited the Bay Area at the beginning of November. Their Professor is Susanne Siepl-Coates who for years has been leading the charge in teaching design studios that address the architecture of care, health and universal design. This year her students are tasked with a design proposal for a palliative care facility on the campus of Mills College.

AHWGO hosted a learning forum for the students, inviting practitioners from architecture and social services to engage with students about their projects.

This is what students had to say about their experience in their newsletter:

As a highlight of the trip, the students were invited by the bay-area-based forum ‘At Home with Growing Old(er)’ [AHWGO] in Berkeley to present initial design ideas/visions and to engage in a dialogue with a group of interdisciplinary hospice professionals and academics.

architecture_of_palliative

A Home For All Ages

A Home For All Ages

A Home For All Ages gives us the option to live longterm in our home if we choose to do so.  In her recent keynote speech at the Avenidas Housing Conference Susanne Stadler emphasized that it is time for personal activism in our own homes. Setting the right priorities is key in making one’s home safe and delightful. We can build on the hard won baseline of accessibility, think of our homes as adaptable ‘beings’ (this should be a balanced relationship – not just us adapting to a home that has smaller and bigger inconveniences!) and make them livable for all ages. See more:  A Home For All Ages

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