Forum, Network and Resource for the Challenges of an Aging Society

Forum, Network and Resource for the Challenges of an Aging Society

What does it take to be 'at home with growing older'?

The challenges of growing older require active inquiry. AHWGO is a group of multi-disciplinary professionals who have come together to re-envision the aging experience. We present monthly events with top-notch speakers on a wide variety of topics. Use our resources to look beyond your own discipline, both for your professional work and your personal aging decisions. Take advantage of our collective experience as you create environments that support people as they age.

Next Events

How can we keep older adults connected?

How can we keep older adults connected?

December 7, 2017, 6pm to 8pm, doors open 5:30pm
Metta Fund, 850 Battery Street. San Francisco
Suggested Donation $15 

 

Being social, hanging out, working together, having dinner parties, going to your kids school events – it all seems so easy and sometimes even cumbersome but then for many adults there comes a time when socializing is not part of everyday life anymore. It requires an effort and many people are not prepared for it, they give up.  More than 8 million adults age 50 and older are affected by isolation. The health risks of prolonged isolation are equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes a day. Individuals with less social connection have disrupted sleep patterns, altered immune systems, more inflammation and higher levels of stress hormones. One recent study found that isolation increases the risk of heart disease by 29 percent and stroke by 32 percent.

In the age of social connectedness, isolation is a problem more than ever. As more people are living longer and are aging and dying alone, how can we better address  this mounting epidemic of social isolation and emotional suffering? What are the multitude of factors, from personal life transitions, poorly designed homes, lack of accessible transportation, and any number of health and wellness challenges, to environmental, cultural, and societal influences?  And what impact can we make now and in the future? We will discuss these questions in the context of the work of four San Francisco organizations, San FranciscoVillage, Senior Center without Walls, Little Brothers – Friends of the Elderly, and Felton Institute and in the context of the multi-cultural and multi-lingual population of San Francisco, with its variety of health and wellness needs.

Speakers and Moderator:

  • Kate Hoepke, Executive Director, San Francisco Village
  • Katie Wade, Program Manager, Senior Center Without Walls
  • Cathy Michalec, Executive Director, Little Brothers – Friends of the Elderly
  • Keith Wong, Clinical Case Manager, Felton Institute, Senior Division
  • Moderator: Cathy Spensley, Director of Senior Division, Felton Institute

RSVP How Can We Keep Older Adults Connected?

Of Interest

An Empirical Approach to Reframing Aging and Ageism

An Empirical Approach to Reframing Aging and Ageism

“America is having conversations about varying sources of inequality—we’re talking about how gender, race, economic status, or citizenship status can shape life trajectories and what the public response should be. And we are accustomed to hearing about “disruptions” or changes that create new opportunities, new challenges, and essentially, a new normal. The topic of aging isn’t coming up in any of these conversations. Americans hear little about aging as a matter that requires a public response, and even less about ageism—discrimination based on age.” Read more on this at http://frameworksinstitute.org/assets/files/aging_elder_abuse/aging_research_report_final_2017.pdf

Design x Technology + Medicine = Embolden Bodies

Design x Technology + Medicine = Embolden Bodies

Something we have been talking at AHWGO becomes more of a reality through 3D printing. The designers and architects Charles and Ray Eames brought design many years ago into medicine but somehow this marriage was suspended until just now.  Ted Talk illustrates possibilities.

The Architecture of Palliative Care

Thirteen architecture students from Kansas State University visited the Bay Area at the beginning of November. Their Professor is Susanne Siepl-Coates who for years has been leading the charge in teaching design studios that address the architecture of care, health and universal design. This year her students are tasked with a design proposal for a palliative care facility on the campus of Mills College.

AHWGO hosted a learning forum for the students, inviting practitioners from architecture and social services to engage with students about their projects.

This is what students had to say about their experience in their newsletter:

As a highlight of the trip, the students were invited by the bay-area-based forum ‘At Home with Growing Old(er)’ [AHWGO] in Berkeley to present initial design ideas/visions and to engage in a dialogue with a group of interdisciplinary hospice professionals and academics.

architecture_of_palliative

A Home For All Ages

A Home For All Ages

A Home For All Ages gives us the option to live longterm in our home if we choose to do so.  In her recent keynote speech at the Avenidas Housing Conference Susanne Stadler emphasized that it is time for personal activism in our own homes. Setting the right priorities is key in making one’s home safe and delightful. We can build on the hard won baseline of accessibility, think of our homes as adaptable ‘beings’ (this should be a balanced relationship – not just us adapting to a home that has smaller and bigger inconveniences!) and make them livable for all ages. See more:  A Home For All Ages

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