Forum, Network and Resource for the Challenges of an Aging Society

Forum, Network and Resource for the Challenges of an Aging Society

What does it take to be 'at home with growing older'?

The challenges of growing older require active inquiry. AHWGO is a group of multi-disciplinary professionals who have come together to re-envision the aging experience. We present monthly events with top-notch speakers on a wide variety of topics. Use our resources to look beyond your own discipline, both for your professional work and your personal aging decisions. Take advantage of our collective experience as you create environments that support people as they age.

Next Events

Social Security, Medicare and the Campaign against Entitlements

Social Security, Medicare and the Campaign against Entitlements

 
 
February 1, 2018, 5:30pm to 7:30pm
San Francisco Main Library Latino/Hispanic Room A&B
100 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102

 


It was 1935 when the Social Security Act was signed and 1965 when Medicare was enacted. Both programs provide significant protection against poverty in older age, yet some have questioned their validity and sustainability for more than 20 years. In 2018 this discussion is being moved to the top of the agenda. The House GOP caucus plans to work on entitlement reform next year as a way to “tackle the debt and the deficit,” according to House Speaker Paul Ryan. Ryan specifically mentioned Medicare as being the “biggest entitlement that’s got to have reform.”As Carroll Estes said in her classic book, ‘The Aging Enterprise’, originally published in 1979: “The individual aging experience is shaped by the way society treats its elders, via social policies on employment, retirement, health care, income and the family.”This forum will provide essential talking points about these programs so that we can better inform ourselves and others about what “reform” would mean for our society, for our economy, and for all of us as we age.

Speakers:   

  • Caroll L. Estes: Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF),  Past-chair of the Board of Directors of The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare
  • Kevin Prindiville: Executive Director, Justice in Aging

Carroll L. Estes is Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where she founded and directed the campus-wide Institute for Health & Aging (1979-1998), and chaired the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (1981-1992) in the School of Nursing.  Dr. Estes is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies, and past President of three national organizations in aging: The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), the American Society on Aging (ASA) and the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE). Dr. Estes is past-chair of the Board of Directors of The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and its Foundation. She is past Board Chair of the Center for Global Policy Solutions. She served as consultant to U. S. Commissioners of Social Security and to U. S. Senate and House Committees on Aging for more than three decades. In 2014 Estes received the University of California Medal, UCSF’s highest recognition. The League of Women Voters named Estes, “A Woman Who Could Be President” (San Francisco, 1998). The National Organization of Women (NOW) named her a “Woman of Action” (2012). Her current research is on Social Security and Medicare policy, health reform, Medicaid, long term care, and elder women’s economic and health security. Credited as a founding scholar of the “political economy of aging” and “critical gerontology,” Estes has authored, co-authored, and co-edited 24 books. Her latest book is “Aging A-Z: Critical Concepts in Gerontology” will be published late 2018 by Routledge.

Kevin Prindiville is Justice in Aging’s Executive Director. He is a nationally recognized expert on Medicare and Medicaid policy and has served as counsel in several class action lawsuits protecting low-income senior’s access to public benefits.Kevin has a long history of developing partnerships and directing strategic advocacy efforts. The author of numerous articles, reports and briefs, he frequently testifies before legislators, presents at national conferences and works closely with both federal and state regulatory agencies. He also is quoted often in national and California media. Kevin is on the Board of Directors of the American Society on Aging.Prior to joining Justice in Aging, Prindiville worked as a staff attorney at the Pennsylvania Health Law Project in Philadelphia where he represented low-income individuals having trouble obtaining health care. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the University of California, San Diego. Kevin is admitted to the California Bar.

RSVP to Social Security, Medicare and the Campaign against Entitlements
Or RSVP by phone  (510)771-0116

Of Interest

An Empirical Approach to Reframing Aging and Ageism

An Empirical Approach to Reframing Aging and Ageism

“America is having conversations about varying sources of inequality—we’re talking about how gender, race, economic status, or citizenship status can shape life trajectories and what the public response should be. And we are accustomed to hearing about “disruptions” or changes that create new opportunities, new challenges, and essentially, a new normal. The topic of aging isn’t coming up in any of these conversations. Americans hear little about aging as a matter that requires a public response, and even less about ageism—discrimination based on age.” Read more on this at http://frameworksinstitute.org/assets/files/aging_elder_abuse/aging_research_report_final_2017.pdf

Design x Technology + Medicine = Embolden Bodies

Design x Technology + Medicine = Embolden Bodies

Something we have been talking at AHWGO becomes more of a reality through 3D printing. The designers and architects Charles and Ray Eames brought design many years ago into medicine but somehow this marriage was suspended until just now.  Ted Talk illustrates possibilities.

The Architecture of Palliative Care

Thirteen architecture students from Kansas State University visited the Bay Area at the beginning of November. Their Professor is Susanne Siepl-Coates who for years has been leading the charge in teaching design studios that address the architecture of care, health and universal design. This year her students are tasked with a design proposal for a palliative care facility on the campus of Mills College.

AHWGO hosted a learning forum for the students, inviting practitioners from architecture and social services to engage with students about their projects.

This is what students had to say about their experience in their newsletter:

As a highlight of the trip, the students were invited by the bay-area-based forum ‘At Home with Growing Old(er)’ [AHWGO] in Berkeley to present initial design ideas/visions and to engage in a dialogue with a group of interdisciplinary hospice professionals and academics.

architecture_of_palliative

A Home For All Ages

A Home For All Ages

A Home For All Ages gives us the option to live longterm in our home if we choose to do so.  In her recent keynote speech at the Avenidas Housing Conference Susanne Stadler emphasized that it is time for personal activism in our own homes. Setting the right priorities is key in making one’s home safe and delightful. We can build on the hard won baseline of accessibility, think of our homes as adaptable ‘beings’ (this should be a balanced relationship – not just us adapting to a home that has smaller and bigger inconveniences!) and make them livable for all ages. See more:  A Home For All Ages

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